The Tragic Life of Linda: a Brave New World Comparison

CW Spoilers and TW cultural references to Native Americans, please read with care.

Dear readers,

Linda. Where to begin. Her life wasn’t so typical, but in Brave New World, we meet her in two different ways. She started out as a beta plus, which is a step below an alpha plus, and then, we see her as the author was meant to see her. Let’s compare how Linda’s life transformed from book to screen.

In the book, Linda was at first the typical healthy English girl, much like what Lenina was. Linda, a Beta Plus who worked in the fertilizing room, however strong she appeared to be, was left behind in transit when she and the then younger DHC, Tomakin he was called in the book, went to the Savage reservation. In the book, the Savage Reservation was a key negative connotation for Native American reservation. It was probably situated in the Tribal lands in New Mexico. Let’s just refer to the book’s version of it not as a “Savage” place, but as Malpais. That’s what John called it, and for future reference, John is Linda and Tomakin’s child. Back to Linda.

So anyway, Linda was left behind because she fell and hit her head, and some hunters from Malpais found her on the floor and brought her to the lands. Linda didn’t even know she was pregnant at the time, and all girls who are unsterilized in the Brave New World must do what is called “Malthusian Drill.” The numbers, Linda says, go by one, two, and three and so on. Not much is told of how Malthusian drill actually works, and the contraceptive precautions are still on Lenina’s mind in the book after she’s done cavorting with Henry on the golf course, at the cabaret, and then in his room of course. What we learn from Linda is astounding. She had soma before, but when she was forced to live among the Natives in the book, she found herself in a culture shock. One, she was not supposed to just have any man she wanted. People hated her, hated her son John, and it was evident throughout Linda’s future life in the land if Malpais. The Natives sang songs about Linda, not very reverent songs, and the little boys frequently shoved John away, and then, as I wrote prior to this post, the worst of it was when John wanted to do a manhood ceremony among the boys. Now he was able to understand Linda’s world too, but John had some Native American upbringing among the boys and the men of the Pueblo. They taught John about the spiritual practice of the Native American peoples of the pueblo, and he never said the word Ford but said Oh my God instead. John had a lot of respect for the eagle god Pookong, and the son of the One True God, the Jesus everybody complains about in real life. John one day said he wanted to be crucified. If this isn’t a sad person, I don’t know what is.

While John is growing up, he sees his mother, Linda, drunk on the floor or having a lot of sex with Pope, a young man she’s attracted to. Pope brings Linda lots of mescal, which is very strong stuff, but let’s compare this quick to the show. Linda doesn’t drink mescal in the show, instead it’s moonshine.

The most confusing thing about Linda is how she dies. In the show, she’s pictured dead on the marble slab. In the book, Linda’s life among the Natives is brought to a close when Bernard and Lenina rescue both her and her son John. One needs to have at least one reckoning with John and Tomakin, the DHC. Now, Linda’s life in the book and Linda’s life in the show are a bit different. Let’s look at Linda’s on screen appearance.

First of all, Linda is a much the same drunk Beta plus who can’t put up with being happy without drugs. Linda and John are busy trying to get Bernard Marx healed up from a wound he receives at the theater park. Like I said in the previous post, the Native land of Malpais is replaced in the show with a simple theme park, the Savage lands. It’s not about a tribe, but the rebels are hard to tame, according to the all uppity happy Eurocentric New London. Let’s also say that Linda and John were different, and John didn’t share his life story much in Episode 3. The big thing is that John was not greeted by Mustapha Mond, who by the way, in the show was a woman. Why?????? I’m not trying to be sexist here, but if you are going to follow the source material, shouldn’t Mustapha be male? And intimidating? I get that we need progress in the 26th century, but do we want to follow the source material or go our deviant separate way from it?

We deviate a lot when John and Linda are confronted with Madison, the pregnant bride from the theater, and she goes in and says she’s going to kill teh outsiders, Linda, and John. Madison meets her end, which is not saying much of Kiakime, the Native girl John likes in the book. Kothlu doesn’t even speak to John in the book, and Linda tries to understand the whole point of weddings, but then is interrupted by John running away from the wedding procession. The manhood ceremony being the most hurtful thing John is experiencing, he is called the “son of the she-dog.” The Natives’ references to Linda as a she-dog are poignant, but extremely hurtful given Linda’s different culture and upbringing and more importantly, her conditioning.

Linda dies in the book lying comfortably in the bed, the Soma at her side, in the Park Lane Hospital of the Dying, but we don’t see this in the show. Linda is sitting on a morgue slab, the victim of something that went wrong in the rocket, and we don’t know how Linda died … yet. However, John goes mad, and as the happy people of New London will tell you, John doesn’t know how to cope with Linda’s death. This is natural for humans, but with death conditioning, which to me is gross and unnatural, you have tots and little tykes, kids rather, going to a hospital of the dying in the locale and having to eat treats every time someone dies. When Linda died in the book, the young Delta boys in the hospital got eclairs. The boys also got chocolate cream, and this is supposed to make them cope with death? I don’t see that as anything close to natural.

In the show, there is also another plot element. The rebels tell the outsiders, Linda and John among them, that “We are a free people.” They say they’re sick and tired of being fenced in and judged for the amusement of the Indra users, the New Londoners. They’re tired of it. So what will happen next? Stay tuned, and I will write more.

Note that I do like the idea of Mustapha Mond being a woman, but why?????? Why did they have to choose a woman to play the part of a world controller? In the source material, there is quite a bit of gender misinformation, but I see where this is going. The progress to a woman ruling the world is getting stronger every day, and so should be acknowledged in the show. However, do we want to try and reenact Huxley and his source material? Let’s see when I watch next, and yes, I’ll be writing more reviews in the coming days about a future episode or two, but yeah. LEt’s see what the future holds for John, Lenina, and Bernard.

Beth

Introducing Brave New World Series Reviews: Episodes 1 and 2

CW Spoilers, details mentioned here are those involving the Peacock/Netflix show Brave New World, and compares to the original source material by Aldous Huxley. Please skip if you never read the book or seen the show, but read on if you want a serious review.

Dear readers,

I love old books, and there’s something important to note. Brave New World, the masterpiece by Aldous Huxley, has its own special category of awesomeness that I never fail to be dissatisfied by. First off, this book shows you a world utopian society with a scientific caste system, but beyond this, the show is awkwardly different from the source material. If you have read either book or seen the show episodes 1 and 2, read on. I will be hijacking my own blog to review the entire series a bit at a time. See the above CW (content warning) for details and a spoiler alert is in effect.

Here are the highlights from episodes 1 and 2, and how they compare to the book source material. Did the production company get this right?

  1. The beginning. In the book’s beginning, we meet the DHC, or the Director of Hatchery and Conditioning for Central London, which in the show is called New London. Nice job, guys. But that’s where the show is a bit different. We meet Lenina Crowne, whose name in the show is pronounced “laneena”, but I totally understand the alternate pronouncing of her name in book narrations I’ve scrolled through. In the book, Lenina is seen injecting her embryonic patients with the usual stuff, and there are students and guides there to see it all happen. However, in the show, it’s just Lenina, brunette instead of blonde (see next item) and she’s injecting embryos as per the usual thing she does. You don’t see Henry though till the middle and the first man Lenina meets in the book is Henry, but in the show, it’s our hero, Bernie or should I say, Bernard Marx. That’s a big deviation from the source materials.
  2. Lenina’s hair is blonde, and she’s pleasantly pretty in the book. In the show, as described to me through the UK descriptor, she’s brunette. Why the change? Is it that blondes aren’t pretty anymore?
  3. Savage Lands versus Savage Reservation. Oh, did I mention that savages are mentioned in both books and the show? In the book, however, Native Americans are not portrayed well, as was expected in the 1930s when Huxley wrote the source material, and John of course was a British kid dressing up in Native American attire, and we meet John when Lenina and Bernard went to the “Savage Reservations” in New Mexico in the book source material. How it deviates with the show! We meet John before Lenina boards the rocket to the Savage Lands, and the whole land is a theme park, not a fenced in reservation. John is not among Native Americans, but among people who choose to live a so called primitive existence. John also tries to go after a girl, but we don’t see this in the book until John tells his story to Bernard, and the story is a hopelessly tragic one. John wanted to marry a Native American girl, Kiakime, and the girl was actually married to Kothlu, a young Native boy. Sadly, this show iteration of John and Kia’s romance is worse. Instead of the Native born Kiakime, we get Madison, and instead of Kothlu, we get this stranger from the prop store. Madison is pregnant, and we don’t know who did this, and John is an outcast as in the original source material. See next item.
  4. The festival deviates from book to show. John’s status with the Natives (I refuse to use the word Savage here.) is so low because they called him names, chanted songs about him, the whole bit. What bothered me most was when John wanted to do a manhood ceremony with the young boys who were to become men, and they said the most hurtful words. “No, not for you, white hair, not for the son of the she-dog.” They referred to Linda, his mother, as such because of her frequent amatory encounters with their men. However, I wouldn’t go about calling women this because it’s rather hurtful, and to refer to her son as a white hair though was worse. In the show, John is told to stay away from Madison, and the guy says, in no uncertain terms, that he’d kill John if he got close to Madison. Linda, of course, objects. We meet John in the book during a drumming festival, and Lenina constantly babbles on about the drums, and she compares them to everything possible, including “a lower caste community sing.” We. haven’t gotten to the community sings, but I’ll suggest we talk about that soon.
  5. The actual festival in the show was a movie theater, and in that theater, there was a circus of course. This did not include drums, and there weren’t a bad smelling dude who guided Lenina and her compadre around. This seemed odd.
  6. The rest home. Like, am I going to tell you how deviant that whole thing in the show was? Lenina and Bernard go on a rocket to the “Savage Lands” which as I stated before is a theme park for primitive life. Now, let’s talk about the hotel. Bernard, as in the book, is an alpha plus. Taht’s the highest caste in the caste system in New London. Lenina is a beta plus, one step lower but that is to be expected if you want to stay true to the source material. They receive badges, something not mentioned in the book, but in the book they got keys. The rest house was a private thing, sort of. Now the hotel did have a balcony, and it was much more luxurious in the show. Weirder still, the bureaucrats Lenina and Bernard are treated to a bus tour of the Savage Lands. Now, let’s talk further about the meeting between Bernard and John.
  7. Bernard is unconscious when meeting John for the first time, but John meets Lenina after they’re hiding in the apartment in the Savage Lands. Let me tell you, the Savage Lands are about five centuries behind the 26th century, but this theme park is no playground. There’s a lot of violence and jealousy and a lot of what you might call the same behavior you’d see in Straight Out of Compton. It’s not the same as in the book, where there’s a highly charged electric fence, and all the Natives are fenced in and not allowed to leave. Lenina is sleeping when John meets her. But in the show, we have Bernard lying wounded, but unconscious, I’m sure he has to make it, and Lenina has her face cupped in John’s hand in the final scene of episode 2. One more detail.
  8. The Soma rations. Where to begin. The book has lots of instances of the drug known as “soma.” In the show, just about everybody has a soma dispenser, like where to we get creative with this? Soma is amazing, for the most part, in the book. It numbs your mind and it gives you that eternal “soma holiday” as is referenced many times over in Huxley’s source material. However, the dispensers are a show creation. When the people get their soma rations each day, the soma is dispensed to the lower classes in boxes, little boxes, and the boxes hold the little yellow pill in each compartment. Soma rations are given to everybody in the show, but in the show, everybody uses the trains. Where’s the flying? In the book, Henry and Bernard are flying in futuristic helicopters, aircrafts that go from settings like wasp to bumblebee and so on. However, only the lower castes, gamma on down, use the trains and the monorails are packed with them. Every day after the main day shifts are over, you see lines upon lines of these “twins” and so on, and they populate the trains thus far. There’s no helicopters mentioned throughout the show, but you do see futuristic aircrafts flying about New London. I”m impressed with the descriptions of such.

That’s about all the things I can think of for now. For more on Brave New World, watch for the next blog entry. I will also talk a little bit about it on this week’s forthcoming podcast episodes. I’ll do a couple episodes a week of a review, and moreover, this will be incomplete without it.

To find the show, you need either Peacock in the US or Netflix in the UK, but if you’re blind in the US, download from http://www.audiovault.net, and you will need to erase a desktop file in their folder because it messes up the zip archive. Thank you for reading, and enjoy the show if you can.

Beth

Freedom for Britney: First Steps and Major Changes in the California and American Guardianship and Conservatorship System

Dear readers,

The following is a very important bio that I want Britney to read, and Britney, if you’re reading this, this is my message to you. You will be all right, and I hope you will take the time to love yourself and get up on your two feet and walk away from your father’s control.

Britney, if you didn’t know me before, you will know me now. I saw you in concert in Orlando, so many damn years ago, I was in middle school, you were a cultural icon then, and the milk mustachios were a big damn thing. It was a cute sticker that perched on my upper lip, as though I drank the Got Milk thingy. I didn’t, of course, but I love the songs you sang, and you even had a Britney wash. Herbal essence was amazing with you, and you had a great time performing I could tell. Britney, if there’s anything i want to tell you, it’s that my life was almost like yours is now. I had a guardianship at age seventeen, and I lost all or some or most of my rights, and my dad told me not to be with so many people. Like your dad, my dad was a total dickhead. My dad wouldn’t even let me marry Trenton, my partner, should he see that Trenton was darker than all the boys at Titusville High school. I hate that school because the professionals there would not leave me alone, and I was denied my chance to go to prom, have a magical experience, all that. My life was thoroughly ruined from birth, perhaps, and I should tell you I was emotionally abused for wanting to see the Backstreet Boys in concert, meet them, and be in the spotlight. Well, now I am going to write you a song. I want you to let me sing this because though you might be called a bad singer or actor, so what? You can still be an author, you can still be a thing to be reckoned with in the circles of corruption and those corrupt idiots in California and Florida have one thing coming. us. Britney, I’d suggest you get a book and read it, go to law school, or volunteer as a paralegal or something. Hey, you may not be blind, and you’re so damn beautiful, so you can get jobs easier than I will. But if we team up, well, I want to show you that it’s okay to be you and you need to fly. Spread your wings and fly, why don’t you. Just cut your dad and his pinions off, and go for a flight. You’re an eagle, fly as high as you need to, and let your voice be your guide. Just be yourself, and I’ll be there watching you spread your wings, flying like the bird on the wing you are. Britney, it’s high time you knew you’re a grown woman, and your daddy doesn’t deserve one iota of your wealth, so let’s get ‘em, okay?

With love,

Beth Taurasi

The NFB and HBO

Dear readers,

Do you wonder what is going on in an episode of Game of Thrones? Well, the National Federation of the Blind has a good set of resolutions here, including one commending Netflix, and another deploring HBO. HBO is seriously in big trouble with the NFB for not providing audio description. This I have to agree with. While the NFB is right on with about 90% of its total resolutions, this year’s resolutions are about 99.9% on point. We do need audio description so we can enjoy equal access to everything, and I keep telling my partner and other blind young ones that I can’t stand cartoons, can’t stand fast motion animation without description because hell, I can’t see. HBO should discount all the membership fees for blind people not getting audio described content. They also need to have AD for everything … absolutely everything, because a sighted person doesn’t need that. Netflix has done a hell of a lot more for us than HBO, so let’s keep that straight.

What does the NFB need to do more of in terms of resolutions? Perhaps the code of conduct on sexual harassment needs to be addressed. Perhaps we need to also address the objectification of blind women in convention and training center settings. Perhaps more can be done to prevent the 95% rape of women with comorbid disabling conditions. This I know. So how do we go about it without farming off the resolutions committee to study it? Or without farming off the orgs for this purpose? Think about it, and get back to me later.

Beth

The Fantasy Drama You Want to Check Out

Dear readers,

First of all, thanks immensely for the likes and follows on this blog. I’ve had to disable comments, and I think that was the best thing ever, I mean the best ever decision I made so far. However, I do want to be able to engage with you all, so please feel free to hit me up on Twitter or Facebook if you want comments, but you have to promise me you will not troll, use hate speech, or comment in a way that suggests anything lewd and lascidious or such conduct. Thank you for your consideration.

Now, I’d like to turn your attention to a very common set of fantasy dramas based on either books, comics, or Medieval fantasy. Either of these will do, but I want to warn you, some of the actors and actresses are English or British or similarly accented, so the words might not always find you in a heartbeat. Listen closely to what the people are saying.

As a matter of fact, I like the new Netflix show Cursed. It’s about a girl who becomes a priestess, that kind of thing. Then you have the King, so this sounds a lot like an Arthurian legend, big time. My impression so far is that this is grander than most Medieval fantasy comics, but this is an amazing show so far. Nimway, a young priestess’s daughter ends up becoming summoner of the gods and spirits and such, and her adventures are many. I’m going to delve into this particular show.

Let’s get to the old guard with medieval and magical fantasies. Carnival Row, an Amazon Prime show, is amazingly well described just as Cursed is, but this other show is about Fairies, humans, and others in a modern world. It is about Celtic legends, similar in scope to the Arthurian kinds, but best of all, it has a mix of old and new in it, so check it out if you dare.

There are other kinds of shows, including a Letter For the King on Netflix, but Hulu has not gotten into the habit of doing medieval fantasies, but still I think the Arthurian and Celtic fantasy stories are amazing. The bad thing about these shows is that they are not for kids, so keep the small children in bed while you watch this set of shows. I will not be doing a full length review of Carnival Row unless I can get my butt to watch the show more often, but I do want to binge watch Cursed, and eventually review it. It’ll be quite interesting what happens in the show, but if you want spoilers, I will not provide them here. Thank you for reading.

Beth

What happens when Steve Jobs announces the iPad and Gets the Surprise of His Life?

Dear readers,

It’s kind of weird when the founder of Apple is portrayed as he was, and I have no problem with Steve Jobs … honestly, I know he had to be an asshole to get his work done and get the company back on its feet. But Steve Jobs now has his own set of YouTube poops, and his daughter might want to consider reading or listening to what the YouTuber did here with Steve’s iPad announcement. Oddly enough, I’m sharing this on my iPad 7th gen, a well loved tablet that many apple freaks bow down to and worship but still, I think it was the iPod that was Steve’s crowning glory. Here, below the dotted line, is the video of Steve announcing the pad and getting heckled, as seen through the lens of YouTube poop partygoers, and I have to warn you, the joke’s on everybody who listens. It’s funny, and if you laugh, I’m still not responsible for guts hanging out of the bodies of those who die laughing. You may want to consult your families before listening to this, but don’t put anywhere in your death wills that “I died because of a YouTube poop of Steve Jobs.” So here you go.

Which Disney Movie Would I Most Relate To?

Dear readers,

It’s hard to find out what Disney movie any young blind woman can relate to, but let’s face it: all the princesses were able, sighted, and yes, pretty in pink and blonde, except for Princess Tiana, who later wanted to open her restaurant, and … spoilers, yes, she did. But even Tiana has some sort of a dream and a hope for her future. I’m sorry, but none of the Disney princesses can be relatable to me as a blind female, though I do confess to having a couple favorites, Belle being among them. But Belle wasn’t blind, and she sure wasn’t unable to walk or talk, so what princess could possibly become blind? When I was searching Hailey’s YouTube username, which … shameless plug, blindprincess is her username, but I got these weird Nigerian films that popped up in my search results, and I am now wondering why Disney refuses to do a movie about a princess who can’t see, walk, or … can’t do something uniquely physical to the condition of man. You have a black princess, but most of the others are blonde, so … ditto on Cinderella, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Arielle the mermaid, Princess Mia from the Princess Diaries, Elsa from Frozen, Ana from Frozen, there are no princess figures in the Hunchback of Notre Dame, so … let me browse some more. Oh, Deja from John Carter was Martian, and we don’t even know if Tartis Moores is going to ever be for real, but really. Then you have princesses in other Eurocentric stories, ones that don’t have a name, and epic adventures involving every manner of aspect, Wendy is not a princess in Peter Pan, but you do have that Native girl, Princess Tigerlily, but she gets kidnapped by pirates, so ditto on the damsel part. Okay, and there are princesses well known in books, including Aravis from the Chronicles of Narnia, Trenton’s favorite books, but alas, Aravis was still a damsel, so … totally not relatable and stuff. The only blind princess ever has to be that strange Nigerian story in a film that nobody talks about, and I feel like nobody’s going to understand the story of a blind girl as princess role. Just picture the kids in bed: “Mommy, why aren’t you a princess?” Or perhaps, “Mommy, how did you get blind?” Ugh, I’m sorry, but I can’t tell my children the Eurocentric princess stories because none of them are relatable to black kids, so guess I’ll have to stick with Tiana for my sighted kids of one day far in the distance, but then they could get the wrong impression. Kids are malleable, impressionable, very unable to lie. Like my worker’s daughter doesn’t lie when she says to her mother, “That house smells like poop.” And her mother couldn’t help but believe her daughter because yep, kids are not always dishonest, but kids know stuff adults don’t. But what kills me the most is that a princess is never depicted as blind, and she is never depicted as what Raoul Midon called, “badass and blind.” Yes, I like a princess who’s badass, but please, Disney, I need a way to relate my story to my kids one day. I need to do this for theh worker’s daughter because she’s just too sweet not to do that for. I need to concoct something that she can relate to, a princess who can’t see that represents the women with disabilities who are hurt, traumatized, god forbid raped, and dragged down to the dustbin when they try to find work or find their places in the world. Princess Mia might have had an anomaly in her body image and stuff, but she … I repeat this a million times, was, not, disabled. Should my worker’s daughter, let’s call mer Mia, have to settle? And for less in life? The princess in my story has to be blind or autisticc or both, and Disney won’t pursue any such things. Princesses aren’t blind, my mother said, but guess what? Mom, Dad, you treated me like a badly beaten or browbeaten damsel, so now I have to explain to my kids why I live in a bug infested loft instead of a nice chateau, or why I have no pets or kids in Mia’s case if I told her because yeah, this princess is not supposed to be badass, can’t drive or if I lived in Medieval days, ride horses wherever I want, hell I’d be dead if I was born in the fourteenth century, where Sleeping Beauty takes place. That’s like 13 somethings and so much time ago that automobiles were not invented, cars were scarce later anyway, but there was a great deal of misconception and stereotypes about blind people. The princess in my story has to come from a modern age, which isn’t that magical. Yes, what can I say … we have no fairies, but we do have Wiccans, but if you say the word witch, that’s actually does not have a negative association with it like it did in the bad old days of hanging and public whippings for being a witch, etc etc. Gone are the bad old days of slavery that is more noticeable, but now today’s wording is “human trafficking.” The princess in my story is going to have to be fictional, of course, but I want a story that a blind or disabled kid can relate to. Mia can’t relate to stories about blonde or brunette princesses, especially ones that don’t have to face bullies and kicking feet all the time at school. Since when did a fairy tale princess go to school? Unless you’re Amelia from Princess Diaries, no. Most rich royals had tutors, but this isn’t relatable. Yes, the Disney stories are fun and full of magic, but for an autistic or blind child, this is pure fantasy. It is not only fantasy to be a princess, but to find a role model in the menagerie of princess characters to relate to. I am definitely not Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm, the brothers from Germany, and I liked their animal stories and woodland adventures best, Hansel and Gretel being one of those. But let’s start the story at the beginning. Maybe I should do a separate post later on. IF you guys think a relatable princess should be in the cards for those with disabilities, I think that would be good. The only story I can think was one called Silent Bianca, one about a maiden who could not talk, but the only way to hear her words was by the fireplace, because her mouth was basically silent, her words were like slivers of ice. In the story, spoiler alert, Bianca uses her powers to win a kingdom and fool a bunch of noblemen and soldiers into going home to their wives, they couldn’t believe the voices coming from the cookfires in the morning. So the king made it a point to marry Bianca, and she became a queen. Ugh, does she have to be a marriage piece? What if the protagonist in my story isn’t a princess at all? What if she’s one of the peasant girls like in some of the Grimm stories, like Sweetheart Roland? That one’s about a wicked old woman who tries to kill her good daughter so the ugly daughter can have something and everything she wants, but then she killed her ugly favorite daughter instead, and it gets creepier. Really creepy.

One thing I want to make clear: girls love princess things, stories, themed accessories, but I want to make my story a bit exaggerated for the effect, embellish a few small things, but I do not do not want a marriage piece, a sad ending, or god forbid a wicked old woman. I want the guys to be bad in my story, but the status of the girl must be unknown for now.

If you want to make a comment, please do so on Facebook and Twitter as always, so … there you have it.

Beth

What Happens When a Guy Calls Your Restaurant, Bombs a Job Interview, and then Tries to Fill Out a Visa to Stay in Canada? Watch this video and find out.

Dear readers,

Ownage Pranks has some pretty weird stuff you would love. Please watch the following video, and before you do, watch the previous videos referenced, but make sure you are sitting down and relaxed so you can laugh without your guts spilling out and filling the room. My blog here is not responsible for anyone’s death by laughing funeral costs, so … watch away.

Summer of Boredom Getting You Down? Here’s some bingeworthy and Good Netflix and Other Streaming Content

Dear Readers,

Whether you are a child, teen, or adult who’s bored out of their damn mind this summer because of that darn virus that everybody’s catching, there is quite a bunch of content I can recommend. LEt me review some of the best new and old content I’ve run across on Hulu, Netflix, Disney Plus, Prime Video, and Apple TV Plus.

First, let’s start with how to become members of these streaming thingies. You have to shell out $10 at minimum for Netflix and if you’re a household with multiscreen usage, I’d recommend the 2-screen plan, $15 plus or something around there. However, the cheapest streaming service you can get currently goes to Apple TV Plus for $5 per month. That’s actually not bad. Disney Plus and Hulu can be purchased in a bundle, but that includes ESPN, and you sports enthusiasts might like it, but I didn’t want all that extra content.

Now, let me show you the five or maybe even as many cool new and returning things on all the streaming platforms that might get you over this covid summer.

1. The Baby-Sitters Club books have always been a staple in many a 90s girl’s library, but check this out: Netflix users rejoice, especially if you are a female who grew up in the 90s. This is the Baby-Sitters Club show and the first season begins with Christy’s Great Idea, and honestly, it’s a really great idea complete with the same nostalgia, but with a modern touch to it as well. We meet Christy, the great founder of this glorious club, and she ends up realizing there’s a competitive need in a world where adult baby sitters are not fun. Sitters in my view were teenagers, and girls are more than good at this, but Christy says boys can try it too. OF course, there was an old movie with guys baby sitting in it, but this show is sure to please everybody who grew up with the actual books.

2. For the younger crowd, again on Netflix, we find Danger Mouse. My partner, Trenton, loved the classic DM series, but I’m here to say that the new reboot series is audio described in detail, and the lady who does it has a great British accent, even better there’s a little narration a la Rocky and Bullwinkle. See below for more on that one too.

3. On Amazon Prime Video, which boasts some pretty silly and weird comedy shows, there’s a scifi comedy called Upload, which I completed myself. Imagine a world where you can upload yourself to a big digital server after you die. Now it gets scarier when Nathan, a party boy in his twenties or something, gets uploaded and falls in love with his customer service “angel”, Nora. It puts both of them in some rowdy and wild adventures, danger included. Get ready for some thought provoking questions after you’re finished.

4. The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle is now voiced by Tara Strong who is famous for her voice acting in My Little Pony among other things. Rocky is a big moose, and I believe Bullwinkle is a squirrel, if I’m not exactly mistaken and if memory serves me right. Rocky and Bullwinkle has some interesting narration, and all that stuff you imagine them going through? They see it. Rocky and Bullwinkle had a movie, but this Amazon Prime reboot is great for the whole family.

5. Warning: This one is not worth watching alone, but the Handmaid’s Tale is due for another season. I’ve written so many references in here about the Handmaid’s Tale, but for those who haven’t yet gotten acquainted with it, here’s the premise: the United States becomes an ultra Christian republic, and every word of the book of Genesis becomes law. Gays are hanged, priests of other faiths hanged, you see a bloody mess in a lot of this, but this show captures what could happen if we don’t get off our butts and speak up sharply that our rights belong to us. The Handmaid’s Tale is on Hulu and recently became audio described so enjoy it while we have the recent seasons to muddle through.

6. The Order has a recent new season, and I’d like to thank a certain Chenelle for recommending this show for me. The Order is about a college boy who explores a secret society of magicians who may be responsible for his mother’s death. This series can be found on Netflix, and is a thrill to watch.

7. If you want some trashy comic and humor stuff, jump over to Amazon Prime video and try the Marvelous Mrs. Mayzel, in which a comedian who marries and has kids finds herself having to topple the barriers placed in front of her for being a Jewish woman in New York in the 1950s or so. This takes place at a time when women had to wear skirts, couldn’t even say the f word, and so much more. I think you guys will love this one a lot.

8. In the world of Hulu, we find Shrill, which is abouut a woman making her way in the world. If you want an adult chic flick, this is your passport to chic flick happiness.

9. There’s a good chance you haven’t seen the show Diary of a Future President, but on Disney Plus, you will meet a girl who wants to be the president and … yes, she keeps a diary about her life in middle school. This one’s good for teens and adults alike.

10. F is for family. Ugh, you want a family guy like show that doesn’t include Peter Griffin and his drunken escapades, but does include some stupid gags and such? This one’s for you. Turn it on over to Netflix, and try watching this four season show. Also similar to this one, we have Bojack Horseman, which will be doing its final things, and that is six seasons.

Disclaimer: All of these items here have been audio described for blind and visually impaired audiences, so your blind friends will be able to watch these things. If you have a suggestion about some bingeworthy content on any streaming service, please coment on Twitter or Facebook. Thank you bunches.

Beth