Asking for Help is Not a Crime: Addressing Independence Police On Social Media

Dear readers,

For season 4 of my podcast, I’m going to address a problem that keeps happening every time I ask for a simple favor. I get bullied. There are two people responsible for bullying on a post I created so that only local people were supposed to comment, but unfortunately, a blind keyboard warrior from Florida and a dude who lives too far away in Grand Junction in my backyard commented rudely and rather in a nasty way about my capacity to help and do things for myself. This is not the way to respond to posts asking for help, and I get terrible comments about this stuff all the time. Antibullying programs in school apparently haven’t been enough to teach these people not to bully, and their kids will likely be bullies too because of their bad modeling behavior. There is a really big problem with the woman who sent me the comments, saying, “I’m going to be perfectly honest, but …” She went in and said I was not capable of doing anything at all, and truthfully, that’s not the case. It’s lies like the ones told by the woman who sent me that comment that could get me guardianized again. Britney Spears is already under investigation for striking someone, but guess what? That employee probably did or said something to provoke it. Britney is under a lot of stress from an abusive conservatorship, and I was under such from an abusive prison called a guardianship.

As for my capacity not to do things for myself, I warn you all. Do not write lies and tell lies about my capacity to anyone at all, I don’t care if it’s your social worker or my social worker, my colleagues in DWC or a colleague at work. Do not tell anyone or mention my name about every time I am incapable or something. The terrible comments must stop, I have warned you all. Thankfully, the comments here on WordPress are not allowed to happen because of people like the Florida woman and the Colorado man. These people are trying to get me down, but I warn you all, if you so much as whisper comments about my incapacity which isn’t true at all to people such as a colleague at work, my caseworker, social workers in your state, or anywhere else, I will hear about it. And I won’t go with a professional guardian because I have no money. I want to be able to see friends and my partner, and my in laws. My mother in law is already having tough times, and her adoptive mother and my grandfather are both diagnosed with dementia. It is hard to watch the dementia symptoms progress with those two people, my grandfather being the man who used to read spy novels, make pancakes, and ride his Harley Davidson around Lake Mary or Pensacola. My papa is going to die with the knowledge that he was loved and supported, but the lies about me continue. So who are the bullies so vehemently against me? One of them I was on Messenger audio with, just talking and we just talked like old friends. I can’t believe this guy would do something stupid like this.

There were a few friends who left me nice comments. I want to thank the following people who actually make me believe that humanity is good: first, my buddy Megan who lives not far from my backyard. Next, my buddy Marinela who is the nerdieset chic on Earth and in the whole universe and she’s always going to convention stuff and I absolutely adore her makeup. Even if I can’t wear makeup, not that I wouldn’t wear it, I look better without it anyway. Nothing too personal, but I don’t like makeup and I’m not a good makeup artist. But I swear Marinela’s makeup pallets are interesting, and I wish I had the vision to do makeup like she does, but I’m fine with a professional makeup artist doing my makeup if I absolutely must do it for the stage. Thank you though, Marinela, for being cool. Then there’s Kelly, who lives in Texas, who is the most amazing person I’ve met so far. Kelly is so empathetic to people, and I can’t tell you how many times she’s told me something real. Then there’s Clayton, and by the way, it will be Clayton’s birthday on Saturday. I want my readers to know that this birthday boy knows a few nooks and crannies in the world that I may never have thought of. It’s a struggle, he says, to get help as a blind person because the sighted don’t want us to exist. Sadly, he’s correct on that for some reasons. They include that blindness is feared, as Rosemary Mahoney wrote in one article I read of hers. Examples of feared blindness include when a boy or girl is born blind in places like Africa or Tibet, the family may lose their land and their child would have to die. There was a father in Mexico who tried to make his blind son die via a Roman Catholic mass. This is how much parents, adults in general, and some kids, fear blindness. What I fear most is not blindness itself. I’m sitting here at my desk, typing this blog on a macintosh intel computer, and I’m capable of expressing my thoughts, so what the hell these people did was really stupid. Any unfriending and so on will have to be done with my permission. In fact, it can’t happen because now I have to cope with the nasty comments the bullies left me on Facebook and other social media accounts. There are many teens who aren’t disabled who commit suicide because of commentary that is deeply hurtful. I cried of course, but that’s inevitable. I have a few things I want everybody on social media to do. And it has nothing to do with killing somebody, making things unsafe, or anything at all. But it has to do with empathy, and the empathy has to be built.

  1. First and foremost, say your comments out loud before you attempt to write them down. This coming from my buddy Christine, from Pennsylvania, and it might help in some ways. If the words come out nasty, do not put them down on paper. Think about these comments and their tone, and would you say this to a best friend? Your grandmother? If not, do not write them down.
  2. Go to someone you don’t normally want to work with. This is something I would recommend you do with DVR or a workplace. Offer to buy that person who is always being sexually harassed or bullied a cup of coffee, a can of pop, whatever they ask for. Sit down and talk to that person, ask them how they’re doing, and watch what they say. When I am asked how my day is, sometimes I will say, good. Or if it’s super crappy, I’ll admit it. Listen carefully to the tone of the person’s response, and dig a little deeper. This is a serious thing that could lead to you possibly making friends, or even helping a person in need.
  3. For those who are straight conservatives, I have a dare for you. If you’re a guy, dress up like a drag queen. Get the best costume you can get, and wear it to work. Or if you’re really not in the mood, wear a shirt that presents a liberal cause, example might be something that supports gay and lesbian and transgender people. Also, if you are someone who knows someone with cancer, do the following.
  4. If you know a friend or colleague at work who has had their hair fall off because of cancer, shave your damn head. I would do it if someone I knew had cancer. Trust me. If I found out my dad was bald, well, it would be one of two things: male pattern baldness or cancer. Male pattern baldness is not a shameful thing, and women who lose their hair to anything should never be shamed for it. So if you know a colleague at work, a friend, or family member who has cancer, allopesia or anything else, just shave your head or if you can’t shave your head, the wig comes off and you show your skin.

These things are all great empathy building tools for adults, but here are some that kids can do. Most of the things also apply to adults.

  1. If your parents are acting strangely on FB, ask them why. But log in your brain that this behavior is bad, unacceptable, and wrong. When you’re at school, watch the playground. Who gets bullied the most? Watch your social media accounts for cyberbullying.
  2. If you or a friend is being bullied, tell a teacher or grown up person, otherwise known as a family friend or adult you can trust, about it. Tell the principal if you have to.
  3. IF you have to, work with law enforcement to get the bullies off your tail. Just make sure you gather the screenshots, evidence, documents, etc. Parents, make sure you have something such as Net Nanny Social, or some other monitoring software and let your child know what’s up. All evidence of cyber bullying should be reported to your child’s school or principal.

Thank you for reading. I will have to address this problem in the podcast if anyone even so much as tries to incapacitate me in comments again.

Beth

Author: denverqueen

My name is Beth. I'm blind from birth and enjoy the blogging atmosphere. I am a creative person, a musician, a writer, etc. This is me. Take it or leave it.