Isolation at 19

Dear Readers,

There’s a virus or infection that is attacking our elderly. It’s not really a virus, not a bacterium or a spore. It’s not a real parasite. It’s called isolation, and it’s a weapon of war used by guardianship holders to destroy the person in the room. Here are the symptoms:

Irritability. When I became isolated, could not go anywhere, could not call anyone, I was highly irritable, and my parents wanted medication to stop it. They weren’t truly treating the root of the problem, just the side effect of their cruelty.

Anger. I was so angry, I became incoherent. I would cry easily, become depressed, was not able to understand today’s current music.

Loss of abilities and cognition. My parents might have lied about this one. Seniors who are isolated face dementia symptoms made ten million times worse from isolation and nursing home abuse.

Suicidal thoughts or ideations. I really wanted my own father to die so that the guardianship would be erased, and because he was being abusive, in my stunted mind, I was ready to throw any thing at him. My parents tried antidepressants to stop the anger and irritability and it only led to violence. I unfortunately was repeatedly told that nobody loved or wanted to be with me, which made me, the isolated 19-year-old me, even worses off.

How do you treat isolation?

The solutions are siimple but complicated.

1. Tell your elder or aging parent you love them. Allow them to socialize with their friends, whoever they want to see if possible. Be reasonable.

2. For younger disabled adults, let them go. Let them find meaning in their lives, a love that will last, and their own lives and families.

3. For elders, never put them in care/rest homes or nursing facilities period. There is no room for one more abuse victim in the inn of shame and disgrace of elders who are ixty, eighty, even a hundred or older.

While I was a victim of isolation, I had little to no friends, only Orien Henry was on my mind, and then there was Melissa. My mother refused to accept Melissa, and how she turned against me I will never know. But the issolation seriously put me in no place to stay with my family. I should’ve known this was happening to me, told the cops I was being isolated, and told them to tell my parents off for being abusive. One day, I could have a target on my shirt because of not only blindness, but elder age, deafness, perhaps diabetes, lack of ability to walk, whatever the case. I have a rule for anyone who thinks it’s okay to abuse elders: keep your hands off your aged loved ones. Keep the caretakers away from your elder parent if you feel they can’t be trusted. Granny/nanny cams should be used in situations to save your loved one’s life.

As for a younger adult with disabilities, you should know better than to isolate and drug your family member. If you’re gonna do that, just leave them in the care of a friend they trust, and it’s not about you anymore. When they become eighteen years of age, it’s them, not you who should have a life full of love, meaning, and romance. I am going to one day be the voice that speaks louder than the Austrians yodeling on a mountain so high. You won’t hear me cry out like that though, you’ll hear these words, and only these words: stop the isolation, violence, and abuse. If you’re a lawyer and you’re reading this, you should know. There are twenty things seniors go through when they’re isolated. And I will do a follow up to this post on Medium so that you guys can read the article on Web MD.

Thank you for reading.

Beth

Author: denverqueen

My name is Beth. I'm blind from birth and enjoy the blogging atmosphere. I am a creative person, a musician, a writer, etc. This is me. Take it or leave it.

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