Justification for a Better and clearer Cell Phone Camera to Read Mail for Blind Adults

Dear Readers,
Below are a few things to think about. IF you’re blind and reading this, then you know these things to be somehow true or could happen. Please read this carefully and do not stop till the very end of the post. You should be thinking that what I’m talking about is a need, not a want. There are reasons for it, so listen closely.
If you’re a blind man, you don’t want somebody in your social security stuff, somebody in your food stamps information, somebody in your sensitive medical information such as when your prostate test results came out, when other lab tests come out, whether you’re even mentally ill. This stuff is private, right? Not if you hire a reader, a human reader who would scam and defraud you of what you need to read, hear, and keep. Your sensitive information is something you should hold dear to your heart.
If you’re a blind woman, you don’t want someone such as a human reader in your sensitive information such as what about pregnancy test results, pregnancy information, baby and childcare stuff, your social security info, the information your child’s school sends you, all that stuff should be private. But not if you hire a human reader. If you hire a man to read for you, blind ladies, you could stand a chance for rape and other sexual overtures to happen between you and a reader you hire. What if he brings a PlayBoy magazine to your pad? Ugh. It’s not funny, so ladies, think about this: what if there was a way to read your own mail so you could do it on your own? What about a way to read letters and things such that you don’t have to share that information with a third party such as that creepy neighbor down the block who wants to kiss and fondle you in the middle of the night? Well, there is, but it’s expensive. Either an IPhone or that Google Nexus you want. I am in the running for a Google Nexus 6p, a phone that actually has good things like a better camera. The KNFB Reader is required for many reading tasks. I would like it if we didn’t have to use only that. Just about every other OCR app for Android that my dear Kahili has tried has not worked because of lighting or no good use of the flash. I have no flash and don’t have enough megapixels. In fact, all the reading with KNFB reader has just come out jibberish because of the camera. Ugh. The image was not clear. And I could not read a letter from DVR Colorado saying my case was closed, and why it was closed. Ugh. I would love to read that letter and rip it myself.
Anyhow, the mail should be read by me, or Kahili at all. Kahili needs to know about the same things I need to know about. Kahili should know what we’re in for, what we need, etc. Kahili should know how his future kids are doing, his wife, etc. Of course, we could share important information from our child’s school letters using Google Docs. We could use the Google Sheets to do budget charts, this way we don’t overdo spending. We also need the phone’s NFC tagging so in the event that a child or us may have problems with identifying foods in our pantry such as cans or packaged foods, we can. If a child we conceive has food allergies or a guest has food allergies, we can identify foods with said allergens in them and put them aside. Things like peanut butter are really allergy sensitive for some reason. But peanut allergies don’t come in my family. My hope is that my kids don’t have to have food allergies.
Anyhow, we’re doing just fine. Kahili and I are in need of other justifications for buying this phone set through a grant. Unfortunately, we can’t afford it ourselves without taking a large portion of double payments best suited for buying safer furnishings and other supplies to clean our house or apartment. This is important. At least Kahili has a knack for technological knowledge. Eventualy, I’m bumming away my Apex and going with a more Touch thing. The BrailleNote Touch is so out of price range it’s not even funny. What can we do! The Touch provides more modern web support and you can visit websites more easily. Web visits are important for research purposes and if you want to go somewhere or get a job, these days you must have Internet that works. If I’m out, then yes, the Internet must be a thing to have even in the palm of my hand.
Anyhow, here is what we have so far for both things we want. Hope you readers can add to this.
From Beth, AKA Calypso

Economics of Being a Disabled Adult: What a DisgraceAbout Employment

Dear Readers,
Recently, a young guy I know lost his job no later than three days after he got it. The reason? “Safety concerns” he says. Another guy, username Blind Fury, says that many people won’t hire him. I will try and get a bud of his, Josh, to do an interview for a blog post. Josh has looked all over the country even for IT jobs, jobs that exercise his brains. But Josh says none were available or willing to hire a blind person. Another young man in Wisconsin, someone I know well, he says a new high for unemployed blind or physically disabled adults is … ready for it? 85%. It is a disgrace that so many of us with disabilities are unemployed. I was deemed unemployable in Florida, and I will be happy to blast any person in that place that did this.
Harry McEwing, a man who thought I was just chaotic and nuts, blamed me for all that went wrong with me. Does … Does Harry know anything about the parental psych abuse that took place in the home? No. He knew nothing. And my parents left me with no choice of friends because every friend had to be screened and approved by Mom. Wrong. She even told me what kind of boy to date, what kind of friends to have, what kind of music was acceptable. I’m done with this.
But let’s start with Harry, the guy who did the psych test before my pal Alicia took his place. Harry worked in the Daytona Rehabilitation Center for the Visually Impaired and Blind. I might have switched those terms around, so bear with me. Harry did not do his job properly as a man of social work should do, and instead of doing this, he literally went on blasting me for being incompetent. He suggested that I have an attendant of all things follow my butt around high school. He also said I was “unemployable.” I amounted to nothing in the eyes of the staff at the RCBVI in Daytona. I was told many things that were probably untrue. I have no reason to believe any of the crap because unfortunately, because of people like McEwing, I am a statistic.
What does this story have to do with unemployment? A lot. There are too many downward walking adults hired to help us get jobs, and we only hear negative feedback. The only way to obtain positive feedback is three things: give up, resign, and obey or submit to the low crap. A lot of us have big dreams for ourselves. I wanted to be a singer. I still do, but Kahili in the picture makes things more important. Btw, please read Kahili’s blog because he shares some brief but beautiful things about coming to my abode. I will put a link to his blog below this post. I will at times be writing on his blog about performances and parties we’ve done, stuff we’ve both done together, and the sorts of stuff Kahili might think is weird. Who knows.
Kahili and I are unemployed. We are in a danger zone. Yes, who knows what will happen to me? I have to deal with things like birth control, and of course if my mom or dad were around, I’d absolutely be forced to use an IUD. I will not use any things that require planting something in my body. Ugh, no, no way no how. Come Hell or high water, I will never use shots or IUD treatments to prevent pregnancy. When I want to have children, I’m sure that people are just gonna have to shut the Hell up and deal with it. Kahili and I are gonna do what it takes to have our own jobs, be our own bosses. We cannot at any rate gain employment at some low job such as a day laborer. We cannot be hired a lot of other places. Kahili could have been a useful desk worker, but what employers are desperate for is someone who doesn’t cost them a penny. They only care about the mighty Dollar. The Almighty Dollar even reigns over the Almighty God. Employers do not want you to discuss God at work. Who cares? I’ve given up on all that needs to go into being employed. I’ve totally given up because of what’s happened to my buddies who I know well. Here’s a well known profile of someone in the Federation who is by now famous for a very harrowing case.
Art Yochim, an elderly man seeking to be independent and away from his abusive sister and family, sued the state of Indiana for forcing him to use bad services, and most of all, poor training and other things. Yochim sued Indiana’s Rehab services because most of all, they denied him a stay at the Colorado Center for the Blind. He met and married the love of his life upon coming to Colorado, which took a ghastly three years for Yochim. He and his wife, as they are disabled, have found it hard to find both a safe place to live and jobs. Let’s take Mr. Yochim’s job situation to the floor.
He applied for a few jobs, and after 28 or so years of sales experience, nobody hired him. Even when he tried training with ARC thrift stores and their call center in Denver, the result? We can’t hire you, they said. Yochim, sadly, is not alone. We have thousands upon thousands of blind adults seeking work. And for good reason.
Kahili and I are currently in dire economical needs. We are in dire straits because of his check being screwed up. Mother wants him to be sorry, and she’s put him down a few times, confused him, lied to both of us about bringing food, etc. We’ve seriously considered our options. But the lies and the other stuff have gotten to the point where I figure the cops must be involved in bringing Kahili’s clothing and other possessions here to his new place. I’m here. I’m right here in his and my place, and we’re sharing it together. We share the food, clothing we don’t, but supplies and finances yes. This is a disgrace that we have to rely solely on a screwed up SSI check and it won’t arrive to him till May. Ugh. We need something to buy what we need that works and not have to live like dirty people forever. We need to clean things, and Kahili may need care to at least keep the place at an acceptable maintenance level. But if employers have their way, we will be jobless, childless, whatever for the rest of time. I wouldn’t mind having at least one child. However, a child of mine is staying to the end of his or her eighteenth birthday with me. That is that. IF she wishes to stay longer, that is her right. She can choose what to do after eighteen years old. Trust me, minors should be taught the right way to go, but there is no excuse for abuse of blind or disabled adults.
Men such as Yochim should be allowed to provide for their families. With a wife to support, and with her being medically at risk because of Diabetes Type II, he has his hands full of doctor appointments. She must remain on birth control unless the couple decide on NFP (natural family planning) options and if they even dare to have a child. There is a risk of the child being removed from the couple’s home because of blindness and other disabilities. However, the wife and husband to my knowledge are both competent and capable of realizing what a child brings to the table. They know they have to feed and comfort the little guy or little girl that comes pitter pattering into their lives. They are aware of this stuff, so … yeah. With Art’s elder age, there comes a time when the wife could be widowed early, so he bought a life insurance for her. Now is that reason to believe the husband is not responsible? I think the Yochims have a great life, but short of a job and a means to support themselves, they do fine. But if employers would please appreciate Art’s ability to really sell you on something, maybe they’d hire the guy.
There are many other people who get jobs, but they are mostly the arrogant NFB types. And the ones who are hired are equally as arrogant.
Let’s take a previous boyfriend, Joey Hagemeier. Yes, he doesn’t speak with me, so in my opinion, I’m sorry, but he needs to feel some of the heat here. Hagemeier lied about my relationship retention. In other words, he said I cheated on him. Well, three words for you, Joey, I did not. I never cheated or lied to anyone, and it is you who lied to me. I swear if anyone wants to hire a guy like that, they’ve lost their minds. He could tell me off to his boss at work, saying, “Beth Taurasi doesn’t deserve this position because she cheated on me.” He could sit there and go on and on and display what he calls nudes on Facebook. I’m so glad that Hagemeier is not on my Facebook at the time of posting because if he doesn’t straighten up his buttocks in his chair and reflect on how much arrogance comes from the horrific deeds he’s done to me, he will not be hired. For those reasons, I wouldn’t even hire him for a technology job either.
It may sound like I’m throwing a personal attack on him, but after banning me from visits at Colorado Center, this guy really doesn’t deserve a kinder word than, “You really should not have lied about cheating.” Cheating on someone is something teenagers do, and adults cheating on adults is a serious matter. Hagemeier lied, so I was tempted to write the Miriam Websters people and put Haggaliar in the dictionary and define it as the very crime that Joey committed against me. I hope that if someone who knows this young gentleman reads what I wrote here, there is a serious talk and demotion for Hagemeier. I plan an investigation in to the Center’s arrogance and intolerance against folks with mental disabilities, and yet a transgendered man was allowed to attend the Center. I have nothing against male to female or female to male transgendered people at all, but I see a huge disconnect.
Okay, what does all this have to do with jobless adults like me? A lot. Because of liars like Mr. Hagemeier, because of the disconnect between mental illness and all the rest of the disability community, I am a beggar, a pauper, a raggedy Anne. Does anyone hear me out?
Phew! I’m done writing angrily about the way people treat us. Dr. Phil once said, we teach people how to treat us. This is so true. When liars and arrogant narcissists tell the world that mentally ill people don’t deserve good lives, often it leads to that very result. We disabled adults end up in group settings, bad homes, and abusive lives. Look at what so many of us have contributed in good ways. The blind are employable. Think again if you want to hire someone who wants to cause dramatics, right? Please, bosses and good guys reading this, you should hire someone with a moral compass. Someone who is able and stable enough to do your work and earn you points. Not necessarily a person without mental health issues. But a person who doesn’t lie, steal, scam, cheat, etc.
I will write another Economics post about the ideal employee in the good sense and what is really being put into practice.
Here’s Kahili’s blog:
http://www.kahili.tk

Churches Don’t Know What We Need

Dear Readers,
So while Kahili and I are trying to survive on our own, we realize that churches do not know what we need. Churches often leave all the congregants to their defenses till they donate money to them. The ones who are rich and donate a lot get all the attention. This may apply to Protestant churches, but we know that it’s hard to find a church at all that will provide us with the tools we need to worship and b able to meet the Lord in some way. I hate to say it, but not even the best churches know what to say. Grace Community Church in Denver up in Westminster simply refuses to see that the ride situation is dire, and they refused to help me and Kahili in some way. I’m sorry, but we moved in together whether there was even a temptation or not because we would have faced financial slavery. I would have been alone, completely alone and depressed. He said I should be loved, so that’s what we wanted. As a typical church, Grace did not provide the tools to be married. Here is the map of the church that Kahili and I both think we need. You readers can comment on churches in the Denver area.
1. A church should be willing and able to pick people up and take them there. This means a bus system for said church should be available to us, that is Kahili and I, no matter where we are.
2. A church we attend should be accepting and see the world as it is, and see the disabled as people who need the tools to get where God wants the people to go. This means that if we want a wedding, we must be given the right to marry on both ends.
3. A church should be able and willing to give social opportunities so Kahili and I are not isolated. Buses are sometimes not able to run, and the neighbors in the building are not always available. We would at least like to hang around with some friends who actually care a doll’s ass.
4. A church should support the family as it grows and continues. Kahili and I need to be able to find voluntary babysitting that is not predatory and that involves love and care for our children. We need this as without it, social services will take the baby away and we won’t be able to parent our children. I’ve written heartbreaking stories about parents who’ve lost their children. It makes me angry that anyone would simply snatch a baby away because a mother and father are blind. We’ve received some blindness training, but the blindness training does not compensate for the mild palsy or mental illness. I cannot tell you what heartbreak I face every day thinking of what a baby without me in its life would be like. The parents would tell the growing child that a blind bitch had to give up her child and she did it voluntarily. This is not the case if it were me. We would need to be able to stock our food supply so that a baby and child can eat. We need to be able to love and care for our children, even in the face of all the disabling conditions. A church we attend must be able to fight for us, not for social services.
Those things I mentioned here above are the most essential things a church must do for blind couple families and blind people at all. Kahili and I want to be Godly people, but we find it almost impossible to do. It is absolutely impossible to do anything about separation as far as living arrangements. It is up to us, and being left to our defenses is a bad idea. If you are a reader in the Denver area, feel free to comment with ideas for a church. We need support and we need it right now.
Love,
Calypso

Common Mistakes Made Against Those with Physical Challenges: A Deep Look at the Ways We Can Stop Making These Mistakes

Dear Readers,
Here in this blog, I have highlighted many things that plague me as a disabled woman. Here, however, are some common denominators as a disabled person, maybe even better classified as a person with physical challenges such as blindness that we all face. All those classified as (insert word here) where that blank defines the person as having a significant barrier to the person’s daily functioning face some significant unnecessary barriers to enjoying life itself and being as remotely normal as possible. We take every one of these commonalities seriously. Let me highlight some composites, but the names of any victims who have died have been used because obvious obits were written on such people. People like Kelly M. Bond are important teaching tools for parents so that we all can learn what can happen when Kelly Bonds of this world are left to die in the hills. I have two women and two men I’d like to highlight. So here goes.

Theresa Decker, someone I met at the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind, was born to a very young mother who was irresponsible. She and a young father lived in a little shanty shack where her treatment there was questionable. She was bumped on the head while her twelve-year-old mother was washing her. Years later, Decker would report that she was on seizure medications. She is hearing impaired, and later on, she was adopted by a loving family. Her life was, however, something from Hell. She spent some time in juvenile hall because of a crime she probably did not commit. She spent time on probation, again for something she did not commit. Decker was seriously sad when I met her. Her family was loving to my knowledge, but she missed her brother, Michael. They have seen each other probably, but the worst thing about Theresa’s life was her mistreatment at the hands of a negligent mother of twelve years old. First, I’m sure that mother could’ve done worse than she already did. She could have chosen to give Theresa up for adoption, but she did not.
Kelly M. Bond was 32 years old and was not living the best life. She was born in Nashville, and unbeknownst to her, was subjected to emotional and physical abuse by her family. They accused her repeatedly of lying about her family situation. I knew of Bond via my friend Lacey. Bond was the daughter of Peggy Wilburn Bond and Thomas Bond. If you looked at the obituary of Ms. Bond, you would know this: more of it was written about the others in her life, not Bond herself. Kelly had been killed over a life insurance policy. She spent many years trying to seek solace from her animal friends, a dog called Jerry and a cat called George. She had loved horses and loved skiing. The one thing that Lacey noticed about Kelly and her condition was that Kelly was deteriorating and upon her death, the sister, Emily Bond, acted like it was nothing. Bond died a troubled and abused young woman, unmarried, broken, damaged to the core. Her check was never hers, her life was never hers.
The next two profiles are sketches of disabled people whereby the commonalities are shown and they overcome or succumb to those things.
Eric (name has been changed to protect privacy.) is 19 years old. He is blind and does not know how to manage his own money. The parents never bothered to teach him about adult maturation issues. OF course, it really bugs Eric that he can’t put condoms on or he does not understand what birth control options are available for him and his partner, a young girl called Rachel (name has been changed to protect privacy.) Eric would like to live a normal life. Rachel would like to have children, but she admits she’s not ready yet. Eric’s parents made the big mistake of not allowing him to manage his life and affairs. It is truly disgusting, he says, that his own parents have no faith in his ability to function. It really bugs Eric that in terms of blindness, Eric says, people think he is dumb, stupid, and retarded in that order.
Eric grows up and gets married and stuff. His wife, Elise (name has been changed to protect privacy.) is much younger. Eric developed diabetes type II as a result of age. He is now an elder, yet his sister has abused him for the longest time. His own niece would not show respect to her Uncle Eric. Eric finally went to a training center where he learned skills he needed. He found resources to help him and his new wife cope with a demented father-in-law who refuses to cooperate with social services, and they plan to move in together to a new place.
Kahili is a young native of Denver. He met Calypso when he was 31 years old. His mother is currently attempting to manipulate him so she doesn’t have a foreclosure on her condominium. She lives in luxury and watches TV, but because the mother keeps losing work and working one temporary job after temporary job, she demands things too much and refuses to give Kahili even one cent. Now he lives with Calypso in a top floor apartment, and she’s seriously trying to keep her place.

The Common Mistakes We All Make
1. We tend to shelter disabled children and adults whether we realize it or not.
2. We think disabled people should never have sex or have families. It scares us all. Right?
3. We think of disabled children as less than our other children, and the disabled adults are to us the scum of the earth whether we realize it or not.
4. We sometimes exploit our disabled relatives because, well, we know in our stupid ignorant minds that they won’t even be cognitively aware that we just swiped $700 from their account. Right?
5. We prey on disabled women and men alike, nobody is exempt from being preyed upon in that community.
6. We rob the disabled of their dignity. We tell them who to see, what to do, with whom to live.
7. We often forget that disabled people are people, not animals. We can’t forget this.

How can we remedy these mistakes?
1. Parents must remember that all people, disabled or otherwise, should know about every aspect of life.
2. All adults in our lives should know that we’re people too, and we have loves and feelings too, so we can also have access to birth control, all that stuff.
3. We can all read or write, so why rely on somebody when there’s tech out there to help?
4. Government and nongovernmental agencies can best serve us by realizing we hve voice boxes and can talk. I oftentimes make the mistake of speaking for Kahili but you know, he is a soft spoken young man. We’re a bit confused about settling in this new place, but yeah.

All Moved In: the Saga of Queen Calypso and Her Consort, Kahili

My Dear Readers,
I’m two steps away from turning in the old place’s keys. I”m this close, so close to getting rid of 1107 for good. I’m so close to saying I will not be living in a studio anymore. I’m so close and Kahili feels the worry that the dirt in the room could cost me. Ugh. But seriously. Vacuuming is something I’ve neglected, but having Kahili around has totally changed things. Cortana is piping up on my pc, and she’s being bad right now, but that’s okay. I wouldn’t live another day laughing if she didn’t. But Kahili and I have an appointment. We’re going to discuss ways to prevent unplanned pregnancy without interacting with medications and all that. We’re totally not going to listen too hard or let doctors fool around with our decisions in the bedroom, but as people with disabling conditions such as blindness, we face lots of challenges to our ability to grow and develop. We want to be able to have a better decor in our place other than shabby old furnishings like in the other place. This apartment I swear is going to be the Queen’s castle, the mini palace. I like the idea of red, wine red for any intent and purpose, and gold. Wine red and gold and purple. Violets and emeralds and pretty colors all over the place would make our place look grand. Even in the face of poverty, we’re thinking of buying new things. Kathryn is one good bud I can trust. Kathryn recommended QVC so I’m searching the website and finding stuff we’d need. Kahili loves the idea of a Shark vacuum, and we want a Shark product to clean with because Kahili loves their products. They work, and he says we need cleaning stuff anyhow. We have a buttload of cleaning stuff that does not work, but we’ll think about it. We will eventually get a place with a dishwasher and laundering things in our unit. But now, thinking Aunt Laura, (name has been changed to protect privacy), she could help Kahili and I do laundry since we don’t have a safe way to label and keep clothes from being stolen. We’ve got clothes that are ripped, mostly mine, that we desperately need to use or throw out and I’m updating my clothing. I’ll be wearing any color, but I want mostly wine red or purple violet or gold or yellow dresses. Those are my colors. We could put those colors on a door plaque that reads our names and welcome to the Cair Lomond or something. We’re going to make this place a castle all our own, so what if it was built before a year in the Seventies? So what? we’re still gonna make this our home.
Thank you so much, dear readers, for understanding. It is now five o’clock. I’m seriously thinking I could land my life somewhere. Amadi has been manipulative lately and confused Kahili about going home with her for six months, then moving in permanently with me. This is a trap and we won’t fall for that. Common things parents of disabled people do include manipulate them and take their paychecks whether SSI or SSDI or work earned ones, dictate to us whether we can marry, tell us who to be friends with, dictate where we live, make us obey and do what they want. There are lots of commonalities between disability and parenting mistakes. Too many parents think disabled people should remain holy and sexless, but guess what? Holy sex is not possible if guardianship is on them. Holy sex is holy sex. I can’t tell you any further. Anyhow, Kahili might get lonely in the bedroom. I better hop in and hang out with him for a while. Meanwhile, our doc appointment is important. We’re in love, but do we need to pull a Rush Limbaugh and let others say, “We’re not paying you to have sex with your partner”? I don’t care, if we wanted to, that’s an option. This isn’t the ’50s. This is 2016, we’re gonna do what we want. Thank you for being weird.
Love,
The Denver Queen,
Calypso Consort of Kahili Mahari

Dirty Dealings:Doctors and Other Healthcare Providers In Conspiracy to Keep Disabled Patients Medicated and Incapable of Being People At All

Dear Readers,
So Kahili and I are watching Dirty Dancing. we had cornchips and some spiced up cheese, best we could do. Anyway, we’re at a crossroads when Houseman the doc told his daughter, played by the ever illustrious Jennifer Gray that she should have nothing to do with Johnny and all. Johnny is played by Patrick Swayze. Poor Kahili. But when I went to the doc appointment, I was labeled irresponsible and incompetent, told what to do with my sex life, if there’s any at all, and told to get birth control options. Of course, that’s fine, but there are still able bodied women having loads of children, all out of wedlock. All out of spite, maybe because they won’t use birth control. Religious self righteous shit really does lead to unwanted pregnancy. I’m lucky my therapist gave me the protection from the nurses’ station. I’m lucky that anyone even bothers to call me. Kahili and I are going to have a long trail of hikes together, but marriage will not be taken from us. Anyhow, if any boob wants to make that big a fuss, medicated or not, about me, they should probably go to Hell. Border line personality should not be treated with dangerous medications. The mood stabilizers are too expensive and interact with all birth control options. Kahili and I will marry eventually, but we’re not going to rush the marriage. We want to marry, but I’m not giving my whole life to some boob who is sighted and doesn’t get it. Kahili and I experience enough. So yeah, here we are, what can we do!
Disabled folks are always facing issues with docs saying we shouldn’t have children. Here’s a question: are we pets? Pets are the only beings who should be spayed or neutered, hysterectomy included. I’m not getting a hysterectomy because it would ruin my ability to have kids. Kahili and I do want a child or two, but being denied that right is ultimately a bad idea. To be ordered to have my tubes tied would be the death of me, for real. So this is what I think I may do: I’ll add an unnecessary intrusion upon private matters, compensation for that to the emotional pain and suffering and humiliation provision that I’ll ask for from my parents. If they do not pay up, they will end up in dirt cells so yeah. That’s all folks as Porky Pig would say.

My Shopping List, Laundry List, and the Question of Competency … Really!

Dear Readers,
It is becoming more and more apparent that doctors, nurses, and healthcare professionals are making me look like an idiot. My dear Kahili and I are indeed in love, but does this mean active in any strange way? While I don’t wish to reveal sexual details in a public blog, and for Heaven’s sake I won’t, I do want to establish one thing: disability is no excuse to take rights, and in taking those rights to marry etc., the doctor and therapist, while on opposing reactions, are still getting into the business of the bedroom. The doc said I was irresponsibly having sex, maybe he was assuming so. Kahili and I will not post any sort of indiscretionary material here, so we have a message for doctors and nurses everywhere: while we do believe birth control is great, we believe it should be available for all of us who want to use it. It doesn’t help that I was brought up in parochial schools and Catholic establishments where birth control and contraception is not to be used. Prevention of life is to Catholics a bad thing, but why waste my body on nine kids when responsible family planning things can leave Kahili and I with two? Two children who are healthy and well adjusted and given all the attention is better than sixteen kids like in them polygamous families that don’t get all the love they need. Bigger kids shouldn’t be responsible for the little kids. My rule with families is this: small and intimate and loving is best. There is beauty in simplicity and a smaller sized family is fine by me. Although it’s quite odd that kids in large families behave better, I don’t think it matters about the size of a group of kids.
Regarding the title, I’m about to complete my shopping list. And here it is for the lawsuit:
0,000 plus dollars from the parents for emotional pain and suffering, and there’s more as the guardianship continues.
$5000 for racial profiling Kahili and other boyfriends of what would be called a protected or target class like African American or First Nations peoples.
$20,000 plus for unnecessary intrusion into private affairs, humiliation and civil indignities regarding sex and other matters. May be attached to the already aforementioned emotional pain and suffering.
$240,000 plus from the state of Florida for even allowing this to happen. They bought every single lie my parents told. Lies don’t go far, do they?
Also, there is no way to establish a relationship with Amadi, Kahili’s mother, and she will remain blocked on his Hangouts list for a while again. She said for him and I to leave her alone. I think she’s beginning to see the stuff she’s done wrong, and is convicted herself of committing fraud. She still wants Kahili’s little bit of money for herself, but the pittance is too small for Kahili alone. What must we do?
Anyway, I’m already scheduled to talk to a health educator, and she would probably be able to do an interaction check. I hope there’s something safe out there. Maybe she knows.
There’s more to the shopping list. All the emotional pain and suffering money will probably end up going to down payments on Kahili and me, we by then should buy a house. The rest we’ll use for furniture and clothes, all the things we would need. Then, Kahili could get a day job, we could then unshield things and maybe punch out a couple kids. Then, we’d raise them in comfort. Poverty would wipe all the kids’ dreams away, but with this money, which the state would be required to pay up, I would buy a real piano for my children, they would have the best piano instructors in Colorado, they would play music, they would dance, do martial arts like tae kwon do. My best buddies would be proud.
My children would benefit from another addition to the list of stuff I’d do with the lawsuit money. I’d put a bit aside for university studies, whatever the child may want in the future. I could invest the hell out of some other money for a victims’ rights foundation so I could grant people’s wish to be independent and free and able to do private things, and yes, keep private things private. This other thing about racial profiling will also be a big thing. But most of the emotional and physical pain and suffering money will make up for lost stuff.
Kahili may end up suing his own mother over fraudulent use of benefits and lying about his competence. I’m going to be his advocate and right hand woman, ditto his girlfriend. Thanks.
Thanks a lot, fans and readers, keep up the good support.
For more info about Kahili Mahari, please visit the following site. Go to kahili.tk and read his ruminations. I’ve been his for a while, so he is working on starting up a blog so you guys can check it out. He’s going to write stuff in it, and I hope you all enjoy it.