America: AN Unfinished Story

Fellow Americans, those who celebrated Thanksgiving or didn’t yesterday, this post is dedicated to you. Yesterday, I was thinking about our country’s history, and if you look in the books, it is truly not enough. Sadly, a book is one of the only ways to display the beginning of our nation since all those who traveled on ships such as the Mayflower have died and been buried in the ground. I’m not sure where I should start, but I’ll start with my best page 1.

I got a disturbing email about Congress’s attempts to shut the door on refugees. This is a disgraceful measure if in any case this action is taken. We are not a nation of peace, in fact we only had seventeen years of peace. I have to say this: it all began in 1492. When the storied voyage of Columbus took place, this whole continent was a pristine wilderness inhabited by Arawak or Tano tribesmen and women, however, Columbus had European aspirations, and in so doing, took a few men captive. Even when Erik the Red, and later Leif Ericson discovered this continent, there were no repercussions for the Natives who were here. However, post-voyage, there was much to be desired of the New World. The Europeans had a kind of arrogance about them, a kind of ethnocentric pride whereby finding gold, God, and Glory were the priorities. With this in mind, millions of Natives were told to convert to the European ethnocentric version of Christianity, but that never seemed to work for some. Some converted and found joy, but many were raped or abused because of European ethnocentricity. This saga continued on through two hundred years of Spanish conquests in places that would become Florida and Mexico. Some of this was good, including the conquest of Aztec lands, but the Inca tribes suffered despite the advancements this people made for this world. The king or head of the Incas was strangled on order from some arrogant Europeans who wanted his gold. By 1621, a different story played out in England and other places hailing to be under the rule of Britain. A ragtag band of Puritans which did not like the rule of the British kings who decreed that all the people must be Anglican, aboard a ship called the Mayflower, came ashore on a place we’d now call Massachusetts and came to Plymouth, where the famous rock is now on display. These people called themselves Pilgrims, but in reality, they were among the first refugees to come to our borders. The Puritans had their society built the way they wanted until a brutal winter came. Many of the colonists died that winter, but through the next year, the Puritan leaders came across a group of Natives with all the proper know how regarding planting crops in the New England woods, and these people showed the Puritan people how to plant and harvest and hunt game. For this, the Puritan people wanted to thank the Natives and God for the effort that was put in that year for the harvest and the friendship between the Native people and the refugee group that had settled in their midst.

While the Puritans had squabbles of their own, the First Thanksgiving was not the end of it all. Fastforward to around the 19th century. When Ireland suffered famine due to inadequate crops and a fungal infection tearing apart the homeland, many thousands of Irish fled to what would now be called the United States of America, settling cities, building our railways, etc. These men, women, and children all had work to do, but it was hope they found upon seeing the Statue of Liberty. On the base is written, “Bring me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” It went on to say another thing, bring them all to me. However, the Irish refugees of this period suffered much discrimination, and yet their spirit could not be broken. The same pattern of oppression by ethnic Protestant White Anglos occurs again and again to the Natives, who suffered catastrophic patterns of genocide like the Trail of Tears for the Cherokee nation, the Forced Marches of the Navajo, and many more. You can blame Andrew Jackson for this, and he was a slaveholding White Anglo Protestant guilty of raping and abusing his slaves like so many other planters were but no one cared. Then, there were three Seminole wars in what would be my home state, Florida, and even more, while fighting the Natives, there was a period of time when the wealthiest planters were exposed for abusing those beneath them. There were abolitionists, muckrakers, etc. Many times we told the ethnic selfish planters to free all those who were forced into servitude without pay, but no, these people refused to do as we said. We eventually fought brother against brother, and so the slaves were emancipated. It was the president Abraham Lincoln who made Thanksgiving a national holiday, declaring it the last Thursday in November, as it has been ever since.

Thanksgiving became more prevalent as years passed, but today, we see no reason to learn from past history. After the Emancipation of all African American persons held under slavery, we still had fear of the color black. We still held Native Americans to the reservation lands, trying in vain to apologize, but yet we failed to see the disproportionate unemployment and repeated calls for help from molested young women, or we overlooked the true nature of Native peoples. In the late nineteenth century, we tried, as countless others have, to stamp out Native “spirit” cultures in our nation, doing this to all kinds of people in the west: Navajo, Chickasaw, Cherokee, everybody who we thought we’d cure by, among other things, cutting the girls’ hair, not allowing them to speak their native tongues. We tried, but let’s say that there is no need to step forward. We failed. Native tribes must be respected as the keepers of the land we now call home. Today, we also face imminent threats on all aspects of our society. We wish we could slam the door on Syrians, on top of registering Muslims, but the founders of our nation and the Constitution writers would scoff at this. Congress cannot set apart Muslims because they’re Muslims. We’ve done this in some ways to the Natives we encountered, Irish and other Catholic enclaves and communities, Poles and Russians, and during the Second World War, we tried to single out the Japanese Americans because we were so paranoid that these people were acting as spies for their homeland. Now, we wish to do this to all ethnic groups perporting to practice Islam. This is a clear violation of the law in all respects. May I also point out that voting for Donald Trump will signal an end to the Constitutionality of politics as we know it. We’re facing a threat from Isis, whatever definition this holds. But I plead with you all as a nation, whether you like it or not, listen to what I’m about to say.

When I arrived in Colorado, I met someone who to this day shows us the refugee thing is not over. Unlike the viewpoints of people thinking that Immigrant families are parasites, this young man is proof that this is not the case. Deq Ahmed, a Somali refugee who flew here from Kenya, started his life as a boy in Somalia, a failed state in the Horn of Africa. Deq became blind due to a bout with the measles and the lack of support due to the Somali civil war. Deq’s mother lost a few of her babies, Africa being full of maternal and infant or young child death in most families. Deq’s father and mother eventually passed away, leaving Deq, his brother Ibrahim, also blind, and younger sister Asha and another brother to hold up what is left of the parental lineage. Deq later sought shelter with his uncle, Aden, who was married to Nadifa Mohammed, who bore nine children but lost two. Nadifa’s youngest child, a girl, is by the law of the soil, a citizen of the United States. When Deq failed to graduate from Thicka High School for the Blind, he sought refuge here in Denver with Aden and his family, including Nadifa and her seven children mostly born and raised in Kenya. Up to now, Deq would not have had the chance to become a working man, and his uncle later said that Deq would need a way to become independent, learn to financially provide, etc. Deq found a place in Littleton, set up shop there, and learned to survive or thrive on his own terms, even learning to cook his favorite stuff. He isn’t much for American food, but oh well, no one is sometimes. Deq continues to flourish, after having received a degree in Human Services, worked with female victims with disabilities who suffered abuse and trauma, and then decided to move with Asha and her husband and children to Columbus, Ohio. Now, he is a phone translator for Somali immigrants all over the country, so he is making an impact on people, and he is paying taxes for his work. His uncle has had various jobs, but the transportation industry is flooded with these immigrant nations who are struggling to make ends meet. I know Aden and his children are probably doing well, but the truth behind the refugee crisis here in this country is that it never seems to end. When Irish and Italian refugees came here seeking shelter from war, famine, etc., they faced poverty and hardship due to their perceived problems, but take a close look at some of the most hard workers in America. I’ll say this: my dad’s lineage is made up of Italian house builders, and my dad is one of among thousands of people who innovated the way we explore the reaches of space. My dad’s program ended with Obama but he still works hard, bringing home enough currency to pay off everything from the grocery bill to the mortgage. My dad being a math nut, along with my mom, were descendants from … yep, refugees. In the email I received yesterday, it was said that Steve Jobs’ biological father was also a refugee. Many refugees have played a role in our country’s shaping and the Constitution’s founding and ratification. Why the hell is Congress thinking of shutting this country to Syrians? We have been guilty of many crimes as a people, but among other things, genocide and ethnic discrimination are the top two. Tell your Congressman or Senator to please remember Deq and other refugees who impact us in ways great and small. Whether Pole, Irish, Cuban, or Somali, we’re all created in God’s image and likeness, and this hatred of Muslims is just one more way this country will go to the tubes.

review of the Purity Myth

Since the dawn of time and human records, we have had questions about love, life, and how to do things. Cave paintings depict us making food, the women putting the camp together, men shooting bows and arrows and bringing back the kill for the woman they love, but one thing that organized religions and today’s modern society struggles with is the definition of true “purity.” Nobody talks about male purity, but there is so much talk about women’s purity, and this is sadly a very divisive issue.

Disclaimer: Any names in this post have been changed to keep victims of assault or any current online figures private for legal reasons.

Recently I was wrongfully judged for having had “illicit sex outside the context of marriage.” Excuse my French, but that’s the very act that got me put on this earth. My mother, in all the stuff she has been through, will still to this day not tell me the name of the asshole who did what he did to put me on this very planet. I wonder to myself, was she at a college party? Did the dude slip something in her drink? This could be possible even then because this is now so commonplace on campuses, but women hate that. Should we ban parties? No. But we as a society tend to judge females for an act that either they did because they did not like what place they had in their families or it wasn’t their fault. In the latter, rape is not the woman’s fault, and if something is slipped into a lady’s drink, especially a blind lady’s drink, a man would have supposed license to rape and assault her. Men will do anything to mess up women’s lives. Either that or the general outlook is to “get some” as the street talk says. The truth of the matter is that such a thing is disrespectful to a woman. Since women are the carriers of children, there is no place in this current world for men and boys to be exempt from being good to mothers, sisters, friends and aunts, cousins, etc all female. My family has suffered this fate, not only with Mom, but my aunt. My cousin was sadly assaulted by a man my aunt mistakenly said would be the girl’s father. My cousin and aunt were both innocent and defenseless women at some stage: cousin was only six, and the aunt was in some years pregnant with other kids. This appalls me that some families are like this.

My aunt probably never could love herself after a huge public divorce ensued between her and the man who was supposed to be the kids’ father. My aunt later dated a man she loved, but then he killed himself. Today, my aunt faces huge challenges as a woman with children and mental illness combined. I love my aunt, and because of this, I’m keeping her name off this blog post, and private as well.

The woman guilty of judgment about my “purity” should check out a book I’m about to name by a fame feminist scholar, Jessica Valentin. It’s entitled “The Purity Myth”, and it literally reels out the history of the worth women were given according to the males in their lives, particularly also if their hymen was intact at ancient times. In Biblical times, if a virgin (defined as a female with a hymen intact) wanted to marry a man, parents had to make sure she was worth her weight in gold, particularly if her hymen was intact. That was how you could tell if she had sex back then. Before Jesus came, prostitutes were prostitutes, and the customers of said prostitutes were not judged because they were male. When Jesus arrived on scene and about thirty years later, he forgave an adulterer in his famous phrase, “Let those who have not sinned cast the first stone.” Guess what? Jesus was progressive in his view of women, and when he spoke that statement, that was his way to shut the crowds up. They realized they were wrong, and they left the woman and Jesus standing together. Jesus also said women were the model on which the church is built. He said the church was “his bride. Bride is applied to women.

Valentin would be pretty happy with Jesus’ progressive view of women for the time it was, a time wen the “purest maiden” was selected to marry at a very young age, fourteen. Mary was said to have been scared to carry God’s only son due to the worldview of women with babies outside of marriage. It is, however, God’s mystery.

Today, Jesus would be even more progressive. Valentin’s book shows us that women and men alike in church circles are guilty of judging those young girls and women who choose to or are forced to have sex outside marriage. What we know of Jesus’ life is that he respected his mom, Mary, and Mary was sinless in some Vatican documents. Jesus himself was angry at times, but I would justify his anger because the actions of the people were stupid. What were they thinking while the money changers sold things and livestock no less in what Jesus viewed as “the Father’s house?” Women could now be counted among the things people sold, and even today, Valentin writes about times where young girls and their fathers go to stuff called purity balls. What would Jesus say about this? Perhaps Valentin and Jesus would share the same view: it is a bad idea for any young girl, especially at six, to go to any sort of purity ball. I would say I’m against them. Valentin writes that her dad saw a video of a ball, and he said, in Valentin’s words, “That’s just fucking weird.” Again, just a quote from the book.

Jesus might be angry while standing in one of those government sponsored “virginity movement” balls. Just imagine if your little girl, those who are fathers, and you the daddy, go to a ball like this: you are dancing around a wooden cross. Then you and your daughter join a throng of other daddies and their special sugar pies and pledge that the daughter will “not have any sexual activity before marriage.” What good does that do if the girl is at the youngest age, six? I had no clue what sex was at six, so yeah, I wouldn’t go to said balls. Think of this: what if you, daddy, have to face a guy who rapes your daughter? Then what good is the virginity pledge? Why not look at your own lives for a second, males, and tell me if there’s anything wrong with what you currently see or saw in high school and middle school, and look around your workplaces. How many cohorts of yours have dared you, a male, to go do a woman outside of marriage? It doesn’t always appear this way. The male cohorts in your workplace might say, “C’mon, Man, you can be a man, you really want some pussy?” They might cajole you into walking in on a man raping a woman, then they might say, “Your turn, buddy.” What do you do? I know that a lot of men in my circle of churchgoing men, elders, reverends, associate pastors, etc. would not condone such behavior. If such actions involved any of the real men in my life, I would see the problem. Suppose John walks in on a party of a bunch of men and women. A guy called Scott sitting beside him says, “Oooh, look at that lady’s nipples. They are like so hot they are the size of silver dollars.” First thing that flies through Jon’s mind is the upbringing he might have, the things his sisters and mom taught him about women being respected and how to avoid this sort of thing. John then sees an unconscious girl on the floor being prepped for a rape, some guy pulls down her panties, but then John jumps up and kicks the would be rapist aside. This woman is out of it, disoriented. He takes the lady aside, puts her in his car, then drives her to his house, then puts her on the couch, then calls the law enforcement. He informs the police that there is a party at a location and a group of college buddies were preparing to rape an unconscious and disoriented female. John would state the address, just wait what happens next. There would be arrest warrants issued, but this does not happen enough.

The judgments that are handed down to rape victims are stunning. One young woman, Lucille, (name has been changed to protect privacy) said to me that people judge her because of others’ intrusion in her life. At ten, family members molested her, and for years after she was molested by the same male family members. I have known such people to be either superb and strong through said things, or they could fall into crisis and want to commit suicide.

Is a girl’s worth really about the tiny flip flap of skin between their legs? I say no. Jesus will never measure a girl’s worth that way. Who says that I, woman who is the center of controversy and ridicule on the Internet, am a dirty woman? This is not true, and if anyone says such things about me, they should be thinking about the consequences of defaming people’s character. My parents might have called me out on this, but to even discuss that in court to get rid of the current family guardianship in my view might render some defamation of character things. I might put that on the lawsuit tab. Currently, I think I’m going to use intent to abuse based on evidence in a forensics report, and I think it’s all about me. They intended not to guide, help, and steer, but the real truth was they did not want me to grow up. They wanted the perfect little girl, single, untouched, but then I was and still am playing catch up.

Whatever. But to tell the truth, I was and still sort of am playing catch up because I was emotionally and psychologically and verbally abused even after my eighteenthbirthday. Therefore, intent to abuse in those categories will be the bulk of the lawsuit and emancipation will be another part of it. I may also add damages, lost opportunity for employment, lost future and present wages, etc. They have no clue what hardship I have had due to college debt, monopolized services, and lost jobs I could have had. FSU’s accessibility barriers did not really help much, but another friend sued them so many times they now have to pay her and her boyfriend significant amounts of money. If I hear one word such as, “She will experiment sexually, and we’re afraid she’ll get STD’s and pregnant outside marriage which we will never give back”, I will stamp defamation of character and illicit evidence tampering into the suit, and I’ll ask for even more. I would like a gag order during a hearing so that the words about my sexual life are not spoken once. whether I did or didn’t, it’s nobody in my family’s business whether I did or did not. I have to tell doctors I work with, nurses who examine my pelvic area, etc., that my parents are not allowed my intimate history because of the danger of my character being defamed in the reports they put out. IS it my family’s business or anyone online or off line’s business? No. Nobody should put sexual details about any woman out in public, hence why I changed people’s names and used others as suppose things.

I digress. But if you want to know the truth, we are trying to force virginity on all young girls and women. Not all women are bad, and the bodies of women are not all sexually attractive. As for me, nobody on this interweb will have any reason to judge me. I thought I was over the things I did, but when I heard those things spoken about me, I had to sort of act in the same way as a wife would if a second wife gets between her and her husband. Let me say this: Christ is my husband. Nobody gets between me and Christ, and yes, the Bible is his love letter to me. I have seen it right in front of me, someone tried to give up on me three times, but then God’s light shined through and this man, whose name I won’t state here, decided to do what God has done for over two thousand years. The Bible is a story of God’s wish to give up, and the repeated pattern of God then realizing that one person, namely Moses, Jesus, and Hosea, three characters who either tried to stand in for a wayward soul, or in Jesus’ case, gave up his fleshly existence for all wayward souls. Who remembers Hosea’s plea for … was it Gomer? He pled with her to come back to him, and he said he’d still love her tenderly. How many guys do that? I’m sorry, but it’s I who saw both human instinct to give up and yet it was the same God who never gives up who showed this particular man how not to give up. He still gets defensive about another girl, but sadly, I don’t think she’ll understand that I could feel the whole thing unfold, even without looking at messages that said, I would advise you not to message me again. Okay, God said he would not join his people, but Moses, Hosea, and Jesus all never gave up, and we know that in Jesus’ case, he forgave and reconciled the very people who nailed him to that cross. He gave himself up because he never gave up on me, the guy next door, everybody. So guys and gals, let me just state that there is no place to tell me my love and relationships aren’t real, they never were not real. I always loved all the men I was with, so there went the judgments. Jesus said that if you cast the first stone, then you haven’t sinned. Guess what? I’m a broken woman, broken beyond repair, and God and Jesus are the only things that can fix this problem. They have paid my debt, at least Jesus has erased it on the cross. Thank you for being bored to death or enlightened. I am happy for anyone who read this.

Punitive Death: Kelly’s Story

This post is what Kelly M. Bond’s obituary should have read. I want to dedicate this post to all battered women with disabilities regardless of your status in life. Also, read carefully.

Kelly Marie Bond, born in 1981, to parents Peggy and Thomas Bond, suffered long years of abuse and punishment. What was her unspeakable crime? It wasn’t a crime, but she was blind since birth and had some seizures. Kelly spent her life as a princess locked upstairs, a girl suffering at the hands of what was a manipulative mother who had problems drinking and a father who had no clue. Kelly, in spite of this, had a spirit that did far outweigh others with regards to blindness. But if one took a second look at her, one would see bruises, and later, she was emaciated. Kelly was punished and raped in all sorts of extreme ways and all because she was blind. Data in the U.S. and many famous child abuse cases prove that if abuse is not detected early, death could follow. While Kelly did accomplish things with the Saddle Up therapeutic horseback riding program and while she did ski in Aspen, Colorado, she did not fare well in the hands of her parents. While she had barely any friends in person, she joined a battered women’s group on Yahoo groups. There, she met a therapist, Lacey Hughes, who attempted to save her life, but failed. Kelly died in 2013, and Lacey suspected an overdose of medication was Kelly’s cause of death. However, her parents wanted no responsibility for this. After this occurred, Lacey was threatened with jailtime if she so much as reported. During Lacey’s visits with Kelly, Peggy Bond, too overcome with rage, would accuse Lacey of kidnapping and would repeatedly starve her daughter. Lacey witnessed many such incidents of abuse, including punitive restrictions on Kelly’s use of her computer. That, however, was minor compared to the ultimate crime. Punitive death at the nonchalant hands of Peggy Bond and the rest of the family was the straw that broke Lacey’s back and heart. For all this, Kelly was being punished for being blind. And epileptic. This is a needless crime that does not compute with me. My mother might have said something when I was a girl, but to see someone actually end up punished with murder is an outrage and goes against the spirit of our country.

We, Lacey and myself, will commense a Facebook network of people. We will eventually grow our group, but we plan to call this thing Kelly’s Crusade. This group will help members who are disabled, professionals, etc. WE will welcome all disabled female and male victims of battery, assault, emotional and physical abuse, financial and spiritual abuse, etc. We welcome counselors,therapists, law enforcement officers and lawyers, judges, etc. We welcome all those willing to take on the fight to end violence and needless punitive death of disabled people. We ask that those who knew Bond’s family join us in helping Kelly and others like her. Kelly would be smiling like right now while I type this. Her memorial fund should have gone to a battered women’s shelter. As for me, I think I found my calling. Thank you all for reading.

Homicide Against Persons with Disabilities: An Underreported Problem, How Can We Keep This Problem At Bay?

When I first read the obituary of one Kelly Bond, aged 32, of Nashville, Tennessee, I did not know the real cause of her death. It was never ruled a homicide. However, upon further discussion with her friend, one Lacey Hughes, of Columbus, Ohio, her out of state primary therapist, there was more to the story than her parents, mainly her mother, Peggy W. Bond, were willing to give the public.

The problem with Mrs Bond’s unwillingness to believe Kelly and treat her as God’s gift to this world is a widespread epidemic. We believe that disabled persons keep seeking attention, sometimes we often overlook the real problem behind closed doors.

While those who knew Kelly might see a bright and feathery spirit, upon speaking with Hughes, a totally different story emerged, and furthermore, research I undertook revealed something that could have been prevented surrounding Kelly’s death.

Kelly would have been among 35 per 1000 persons who are female and disabled suffering nonfatal violent crimes, which include rape, physical assault, and malnourishment. Bond suffered psychological and physical abuse, all of which Hughes was made aware of, but was told to “hush hush.” She was banned from doing anything to bring light to Kelly’s situation for fear of being arrested.

Well, let me say this: had Ms. Bond been properly given adjudication and her family prosecuted for the wide scale crimes against her, Hughes says, she would have been alive.

While Kelly might have loved animals, nobody really includes a puppy in an obituary, so this is one’s first clue into spotting the problems.

Upon speaking with Hughes at a cantina in Denver, we were both horrified, particularly myself, at Bond’s treatment at the hands of her parents, mainly her mother. Peggy Bond, also the mother of a golden sister, Emily, 29 and nondisabled, was known to be a rabid alcoholic. Hughes reports, “She would carry a liquor bottle or something in her purse. All the time.” I asked Hughes about Kelly Bond’s abuse story. Hughes was herself blind and is afflicted by multiple sclerosis, despite that she reached out to Bond in a Yahoo group for battered and abused women.

Why, then, you might ask, would Bond be in such a group? In 2006, her repeated calls for help had gone unanswered. By 2013, the year of her death, the calls resulted in a rare but fatal attempt to end her pain. What Hughes told me was quite chilling.

Hughes regrets missing a voice mail from Kelly, but the details are simple, but chilling. “Her parents made her sign a life insurance policy. She was possibly overdosed on her medications. She never woke up.” Upon speaking with Emily, the younger sister, Hughes noticed Emily’s vocal inflection, as though she was discussing what she would have for breakfast that morning. There was no sign of mourning. Why hasn’t America turned to face Kelly and given her the freedom she deserved? I’m playing Nancy Grace here. What is so glamourous about the death of a person? Where is Kelly’s spirit now? Why hasn’t anyone bothered to see Kelly locked upstairs, like a princess badly in need of a real savior? This problem could have been easily prevented.

Bond was supposed to use a seizure dog, but its training was badly corrupted by Peggy. Hughes remembers, “Kelly called me when the dog was put down. She was very sad. I remember when the vet came to the house to do that.” I would now like to ask for Kelly’s soul to quietly rest in peace.

I have a few words for all the Kelly Bonds out there. You have a friend in the justice business. We in the United States cannot sweep the homicide or violent crimes agaainst disabled people any further. For the sake of our lost sister, I ask all the women with disabilities to please, keep reaching out. IF you truly are being abused, put on your walking shoes. Saddle up your wheelchair. Leave the home, do what you must to save your lives. If your parents are truly manipulative, abusive, violent, as a young girl, tell a teacher. If you are a grown up woman, go to a friend you trust. Tell them, give photos, something that can tell the story. Kelly’s last pictures, according to Hughes, show an emaciated woman with no hope of recovering without a doctor’s help. Some depict her with a bruised stomach where an assault could have occurred. Hughes remembers Bond saying it was too painful to stand while she showered. IF that doesn’t tel you enough, then what, my dear fellow Americans, does? What must I do? What must we do? I demand an end to the suffering. We will need a further investigation of all the Bond related cases out there, and we need to do more justice to all disabled females in our social services arena.

Let’s deviate slightly. A young girl was locked in her basement in Wisconsin. Surprisingly, social services found a boy in his room upstairs, tidy and neat. However, the girl’s condition was scary. She had to wear a diaper. She could not leave the basement, even to go to the bathroom. Kelly’s childhood could have easily been spent in that basement. Her case would have been marked “gendercide.” She was, however, one of two females, so what is this?

Miss Bond’s case is something I like to call “abilitycide.” Emily lacking a disability has made it clear. Bond’s case is a clear hate and malice and mistrust of a female with a disability. However, the parents killed Cinderella before she went to the royal ball, if there ever was such a ball. Kelly, if you could only feel how much Lacey and I ache for what could have happened. I wish I could have foiled the murder plot your ghastly hag of a mother did and succeeded with. For this, Kelly, I will never stop until your comrades are prepared to fight the battle of “abilitycide.” This is a crime, something we cannot afford for America as a land of freedom to even allow. You have never been forgotten, and your spirit will rest peacefully. As a commando would say, “Rest easy, soldier. The battle may be lost for you. But we will win the war.”